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WOTD      
Word of the Day - for Toastmasters everywhere
Wednesday 17th July 2019
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pariah (noun) pa-RYE-a or PA-ri-a



Social outcast, someone who is despised and avoided.

"After all," said Rattenden, "I can speak freely. I am a pariah among my kind."

Sypher asked why.

"Because I don't play golf. In London it is impossible to be seriously regarded as a literary man unless you play golf."

William J. Locke, Septimus. Amazon

My college bills had not been paid, and the school tradesmen who administered to the wants of the boys were told not to extend their credit to me. Boots, waistcoats, and pocket-handkerchiefs, which, with some slight superveillance, were at the command of other scholars, were closed luxuries to me. My schoolfellows of course knew that it was so, and I became a Pariah. It is the nature of boys to be cruel.

Anthony Trollope, Autobiography. Amazon

Other feminists, emboldened by the gradual warming of the sexual climate, agreed and the transformation of Wollstonecraft's status from pariah to heroine got under way.

Barbara Taylor, The Guardian, 12 April 2003. Guardian

Speaking of breaks, there's nothing like a breath of circulation-boosting fresh air, particularly after all that porridge. Popping out for a sly cigarette is, of course, totally out of the question. But if you feel a bit of a wally standing there munching on a stick of celery beside all those fag-toting pariahs, why not take a stroll around the block?

Giles Morris, The Guardian, 6 August 2007. Guardian

Riefenstahl’s more conscientious compatriots might stubbornly persist in treating her as a pariah, but, as she aged, a new and mainly American audience embraced her.

Judith Thurman, The New Yorker, 19 March 2007, The New Yorker
reviewing Steven Bach's Leni: The Life and Work of Leni Riefenstahl. Amazon




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